Thermal Discomfort with Cold extremities in relation to age, gender, body mass index in a random sample of a Swiss urban population.

Author:

Mozaffarieh, M. Gasio, P. F. Schotzau, A. Orgul, S. Flammer, J. & Krauchi, K.

Editor:

First

Date:

2010

Region:

Europe

Theme:

Gender and Extreme Temperatures

Language:

English

Publisher:

Population Health Metrics

Full Harvard Reference:

Mozaffarieh, M. Gasio, P. F. Schotzau, A. Orgul, S. Flammer, J. & Krauchi, K. (2010). Thermal Discomfort with Cold extremities in relation to age, gender, body mass index in a random sample of a Swiss urban population. Population Health Metrics 8:17.

This epidemiological study investigates the relationship of thermal discomfort with cold extremities (TDCE) to age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) in a Swiss urban population. A total of 1,001 women (72.3% response rate) and 809 men (60% response rate) returned a completed questionnaire. Statistical analyses revealed the following findings: Younger subjects suffered more intensely from cold extremities than the elderly, and women suffered more than men (particularly younger women). Slimmer subjects suffered significantly more often from cold extremities than subjects with higher BMIs. Thermal discomfort with cold extremities (a relevant symptom of primary vascular dysregulation) occurs at highest intensity in younger, slimmer women and at lowest intensity in elderly, stouter men.