Global Crises: Gendered Vulnerabilities of Structural Inequality.

Author:

Cameron, E.C., Hemingway, S.L., Cunningham, F.J. and Jacquin, K.M.,

Editor:

Date:

2021

Region:

Theme:

Gender, Development & Rights

Language:

English

Publisher:

Full Harvard Reference:

Cameron, E.C., Hemingway, S.L., Cunningham, F.J. and Jacquin, K.M., (2021). Global Crises: Gendered Vulnerabilities of Structural Inequality, Environmental Performance, and Modern Slavery. Human Arenas, pp.1-22.

This paper examines the relationship between environmental stressors associated with climate change, selected structural inequalities, and the estimated prevalence of modern slavery cases across 180 countries. The findings suggested that indicators of poor environmental health may exacerbate structural social inequalities and increase women’s risk of falling victim to modern slavery. Women’s share of seats in parliament, education for women, tree cover loss, agricultural management, and air quality assumed more substantial roles in this prediction. Awareness of the unique relationship between environmental indicators of climate change, gender inequality, and modern slavery provides a meaningful contribution to our understanding of factors driving human exploitation.