How violence against women and girls undermines resilience to climate risks in Chad.

Author:

Le Masson, V., Benoudji, C., Reyes, S. S., & Bernard, G.

Editor:

Date:

2019

Region:

Theme:

Gender-based Violence and Disaster

Language:

English

Publisher:

Full Harvard Reference:

Le Masson, V., Benoudji, C., Reyes, S. S., & Bernard, G. (2019). How violence against women and girls undermines resilience to climate risks in Chad. Disasters, 43. pp 245-270.

What consequences does ‘everyday violence’ have on the abilities of survivors to protect themselves from further risks? This paper seeks to establish the linkages between violence and people’s resilience capacities to survive and adapt to environmental changes, particularly those living in fragile economic and political contexts such as Chad. It investigates not only how the adverse consequences of violence against women and girls affect the health status and livelihoods of survivors, but also their capacities, and those of their household and community members, to further protect themselves from other risks. Empirical evidence collected in Chad as part of the BRACED (Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters) programme shows that ‘everyday violence’ undermines resilience-building at the individual, household, and community level. These results have serious implications for development programmes and the role they need to play to better promote both gender equality and resilience to shocks and stresses.