Mississippi front-line recovery work after Hurricane Katrina: An Analysis of Health Intersections of gender, race and class in advocacy, power relations, and health.

Author:

Weber, L. & Messias, D. K. H.

Editor:

First

Date:

2012

Region:

North America

Theme:

Gender, Disaster and Intersectionality

Language:

English

Publisher:

Elsevier

Full Harvard Reference:

Weber, L. & Messias, D. K. H. (2012). Mississippi front-line recovery work after Hurricane Katrina: An Analysis of Health Intersections of gender, race and class in advocacy, power relations, and health. Social Science & Medicine. Vol. 74 (11): 1833-1841.

This article looks at how health inequities are shaped by gender, race, and class power relations. It uses a feminist intersectional framework to analyses a post disaster dynamic between the government, recovery workers and residents in Mississippi. It finds that health risks of disadvantaged people were increased due to power relationships at a macro-level. Those most affected were women and people of colour, and this highlights the way that social relations of power and control affect health and social inequalities.